Two L1®s in the Same Sound Field

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Fountain Pen

This article is an editorial and expresses the opinion and experience of ST the author. Please post comments in the discussion page.
Thank you.


Here are some rough sketches for discussion purposes. The sound field will does not stop abruptly as might be interpreted by viewing these diagrams. It should continue, fading off gradually, well beyond what is shown here .

I believe that these are extremely conservative, and that your real-life performance will exceed what is suggested here. I just wanted to look at the relative performance between one L1®. and two.

The view is from behind the wall behind the L1™s.


Single L1® mono

L1Dispersion01.jpg

Two L1®s twenty feet apart — dual-mono

The darker blue area represents the area where the two sound fields overlap.

L1Dispersion02.jpg

This also suggests that if you were running stereo instead of dual-mono the stereo "sweet-spot" is going to be extremely wide. You don't have to be between the loudspeakers to hear both Left and Right channels.


Two L1™s with the original single L1™ field superimposed

The dark blue area shows the sound field of the original L1™. The lighter area shows the extra coverage you get by having two L1™s 20 feet apart as compared to a single L1™

L1Dispersion03.jpg

The extra coverage you get with two L1™s spaced 20 feet apart, is about 10 feet on either side of the sound field of a single L1™.


The view from the other side[/b]

(Still very conservative projections)

Blue is the coverage with one L1™. Purple and Orange is the extra coverage that you might get with two L1™s 20 feet apart.

L1Dispersion004.png

Note: The sound field will does not stop abruptly as might be interpreted from the diagrams above. It should continue, fading off gradually, well beyond what is shown here. The purpose of these diagrams is to consider the relative advantages of having two L1®s in dual mono mode compared to a single L1®.


Original Discussion